Integrity, Mobility and Precision

Posted on May 21, 2013 in Sims' Blog

Martial art forms and techniques are about posture and movement and the transitions in between. Every movement that you do will either make you better or worse. You are either deficient, which will make you less effective, or you are efficient (in your movement) which will make you more effective (in your execution). In martial arts, there must be total body synchronization, symmetry and structural alignment integrated at the moment of impact with an opponent or an object. The body must have symmetry so that one part is not stronger than another; all parts must be equally strong. If you cannot do a one- armed push-up or a one-legged squat then you must consider yourself unfit for martial art training. Practice has never made anyone efficient or better if the training and/or practice is incorrect, only perfect practice (structural alignment, symmetry, posture, correct intent, proper movement) makes you better and more efficient. Martial art is about learning to move correctly. Progression, variety and precision are the three main components an instructor must use in their teaching to help each student learn. Each student must attend class on a regular basis to learn how to work out and train. The martial artist must have mobility, precision and above all, integrity in every movement. If you can’t stabilize your body you can’t control your body. If you do not have stability then you are inefficient.  In martial arts training we see a lot of asymmetrical movement (moving one side of the body without balancing the opposite side). If you’re training yourself or teaching someone else that does not have integrity, correct movement, and precision, they won’t have good mobility. So they can’t execute the movement properly or move well which then causes your teaching to go on top of a dysfunctional body.  They look like they have an improvement in their fitness and skill level but it is only temporary, it is built on a shaky foundation of dysfunctional and disjointed body. So it’s not about how many movements (forms, techniques, weapons forms) that you know, but how well you move when performing and/or executing them. You must learn to integrate and synchronize your movements and not isolate them.